Optical Character Recognition (OCR) in Power Platform and RPA from Tomasz Poszytek

A very instructive video on how to extract and process texts. But there is also an overview of the different methods and outputs of the processed texts. All this using OCR and AI Builder.

This video helps not only to understand these logics, but also to get to know and understand them.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Power Apps SVG make your apps prettier and easier to use from Shane Young

Great demonstration on how to create beautiful animated “images” with SVG and a little code. I thought I would share this with you because maybe this is for one or the other. Personally I have an eye for it, but I’m more minimalist and the app has to work.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Power Automate – How to use & reduce flow variables from Reza Dorrani

An exciting approach to how to bypass the many initializations of the variables at the beginning of the flow. Sure, this works a little bit to start with, but if this data only needs to be written once or you want to manipulate it with the tips shown here, then this will save a lot of scrolling at the beginning of the flow. Personally, I like to use the Compose as a variable, as long as it only has to be set at the beginning. Because I can pack them in a scope. However, it would also be possible to have all variables executed side by side.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Power Automate Tutorial – Approvals + Adaptive Cards + Outlook = Awesome from Yash Agarwal

A great demonstration of how to create an Adaptive Card – but even more importantly, I find this in combination with an HTTP request. This makes it much easier and independent of who gives the response.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Power Apps Export data to Excel with Flow – Collections to CSV file from Shane Young

Pass a collection of PowerApps to PowerAutomate, then write that data to a CSV table and create a CSV file. This could still be quite helpful in one case or another. For example, if we want to compile different data and prepare it for an export/import, this is a good way.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Experimental Feature: Embedded Adaptive Card Designer from Audrie Gordon

A very good introduction to the world of the Adaptive Card. I was able to take out a lot of things here and will now create one or the other Adaptive Card myself.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Power Apps Errors Function when using Patch and other data source changes from Shane Young

Very helpful guidance and explanation on how to create a simple error handling within the app. I particularly like the part where you create variable notifications. I’m a big fan of variables and don’t like the hardcoded stuff.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

Create Responsive Power Apps from SharePoint list from Reza Dorrani

This is the easiest way to create a responsive app with PowerApps. The basis for this is the automatically creating app of data from Sharepoint. With small customizations, this app is ready for all Screensize.

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

PowerApps Tracker App including Add row numbers to a gallery from Shane Young

With this formula you will save a lot of time and nerves. Because you can easily add the current row numbers to any collection (or via patch also data table). Watch this video.

ForAll (XY,
Collect (tempCollection,
Last (FirstN(
AddColumns (
DropColumns ( XY, row ),
“row” , CountRows (tempCollection)+1),
CountRows (tempCollection)+1)),
ClearCollect(XY, tempCollection),
Clear (tempCollection)

You can see this video here on my blog because I have rated this video with 5 stars in my Youtube video library. This video was automatically posted using PowerAutomate.

The Big 5 (Variables / Parameters) in PowerApps

Photo by Ann H on Pexels.com

If you create a PowerApp and look around on the internet for solutions, you will come across the following functions from time to time.

  1. set()
  2. updateContext({})
  3. with()
  4. navigate(…,…,PARAMETER)
  5. param()

In the following I will show you briefly what I use them for and why you should think about using them too.


  1. set() function
    This is probably the best known function of all. It sets the value of a global variable. Global variables are useful when you want to store a value and use it on different screens. This can be used in the OnStart, where you set style variables, the logged in user or if you select an element from a gallery and want to use this element somewhere else.

Set(
varUser,
user()
)


  1. updateContext({})
    This is the little brother of the Set function. Sets the value of one or more context variables of the current screen. I mainly use this when I want to change a value (true,false) to show/hide something for example. Mostly a pop-up or another input window.

    Here I set the variable “locPopUp” first to “true” and then again to “false”.

UpdateContext({locPopUp: true});
UpdateContext({locPopUp: false})


  1. with({})-function
    This function I discovered some time ago and is again the little brother of UpdateContext. Here “variables” are stored exclusively for a function and can only be referenced in this function. I use this mainly within functions, as soon as I have to use a certain function several times.

    In this example I write the variable “locText”, to which I then reference 2x in the further course of the function. Important: the With function is closed only at the end of all functions.

With(
{locText: TextInput1.Text},
If(
IsBlank(locText),
“noText,
TextInput1.Text
)
)


  1. navigate(…,…,{PARAMETER})
    This parameter was unknown to me for a long time, because I usually stopped after the first comma and closed the parenthesis. But if you put two more commas after the Navigate, you can pass one or more parameters to the screen you want to navigate by using the curly braces. This parameter is then only available on the following screen. (unless you write it into another variable or pass this value again)

    In this example I pass to Screen1 the parameter “locVariableNextScreen” with the text “Yes we can use it”.

Navigate(
Screen1,
UnCover,
{locVariableNextScreen: “Yes we can use it”}
)


  1. param()
    This provides access to parameters passed to the app when the user has it open. This parameter is usually used less often, as this is exclusively appended to the app’s URL. Thus it is possible to navigate the user to a certain page or to pass certain values to the app.

    Here I pass the parameter “Admin” with the value “true” in the URL. In OnStart I then set the global variable “varAdmin” with the parameter “true”. So I can enable additional settings for an admin, using this parameter. (Visible: varAdmin)

https://apps.powerapps.com/play/543654354453543543?tenantId=dasfdgdsgsfsdfsdf&Admin=true

Set(varAdmin,Param(“Admin“))


Extra tip: If you use a variable and want to use it as a boolean, which is always the opposite of the current state, use the “!” in front of the variable. This reverses the value.

This example reverses the value every time it is executed. If is currently true, it will be changed to false and vice versa.

UpdateContext({locPopUp: !locPopUp})